Tag Archives: rack-spray vs dip-spin

Electrostatic Spray

The Rack-Spray, Soft Touch Technology of DECC

The DECC Company is an almost exclusively rack-spray facility. During the coating process, components never touch…they are all sprayed and cured on their own hook. The only time they touch is during the packing process, and that is only if the customer requires a bulk pack.

Dip-Spin vs Rack-Spray

What this means is that compared to a dip-spin, bulk application process, parts coated in a rack-spray process will have a much more uniform and quality finish. The necessity of 100% sorting is eliminated. However, the most important distinguishing factor is that fallout from the coating process is almost nothing where dip-spin can yield upwards of 20%  defective parts each run.

Although pricing for a bulk, dip-spin process may be enticing on paper, the total processing cost for certain part geometries that don’t lend themselves to a bulk application tends to be higher than a rack-spray price.

Below is a video highlighting the technology we employ at DECC. If you are having quality issues with a dip-spin application, be sure to contact us to see if we can help.

Coated O2 Sensor Bracket

How to Avoid Setting a New Part Up for Failure

When a manufacturing design engineer is developing a component, they are designing it to perform as intended in the field. Failure is not planned for because if there was a perceived threat of such during the design stage, it would be compensated for.

However, “failure” can constitute more than just a component malfunctioning or not performing in the field as intended…especially when a functional coating process is required.

For instance, would a part that requires 100% sorting after a coating operation – when that cost was not factored into the process – due to inadequate structural design be deemed a “failure” as well?  We think it would (read our white paper regarding this specific topic).

Manufacturing design engineers should be sure to consider some of the following when in development of a component that will require a post coating application process:

Continue reading How to Avoid Setting a New Part Up for Failure

Rack Spray vs Dip Spin Infographic Header

Infographic: The True Cost of Dip-Spin vs Rack-Spray

Simply put: there are part geometries that lend themselves to a dip-spin coating process and those that do not.

In fact, even though DECC is a rack-spray facility, we will be the first to direct a customer to a dip-spin competitor when asked to quote a part that is suited for such an application. A rack-spray process can be two to three times more costly than a bulk process and, when it makes sense, we want our customers to take advantage of such pricing.

However, for part geometries that are not suited for dip-spin, quality and delivery issues quickly negate any “savings” when the true cost of processing is evaluated.

Continue reading Infographic: The True Cost of Dip-Spin vs Rack-Spray

Brake Cover

The Limitations of Rack-Spray: Unfortunately, it isn’t for all components

The DECC Company’s goal is to be the go-to resource for all of our customers’ functional coating application needs. In that regard, we understand that we cannot be everything to every customer. As a result, we sometimes have to turn work away and refer it to a dip-spin competitor.

Why? Because for certain part geometries, it is the only processing method that is suited for that particular component. As much as we make the case that certain components should not be processed in a bulk method, there are many instances in which a part should not be processed via a rack-spray application.

Continue reading The Limitations of Rack-Spray: Unfortunately, it isn’t for all components

Dip-spin Snap Ring

Case Study: Rack-Spray When You Can’t Dip-Spin

As DECC is an exclusively rack spray coating applicator, we refer a good amount of work to dip-spin applicators. If we receive an RFQ for a part geometry that lends itself to a bulk application, we will not provide a quote without first sending them to a dip-spin applicator. We want current and potential customers to get the best price possible and a rack spray process is almost always more expensive than a dip-spin process…up front.

However, we also receive a good amount of new work from customers that have sourced with a dip-spin applicator on a part that should not be coated in a bulk method and, as a result, were experiencing significant quality issues.

Continue reading Case Study: Rack-Spray When You Can’t Dip-Spin